Mohammed Image Archive

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Islamic Depictions of Mohammed in Full


Medieval Muslim artists often created paintings and illuminated manuscripts depicting Mohammed in full. Several examples are presented here. Other artists of the era drew Mohammed, but left his face blank so as to technically comply with a sporadically enforced Islamic ban on depicting the Prophet; these faceless images are shown in the second section of the Archive.

In 1999, Islamic art expert Wijdan Ali wrote a scholarly overview of the Muslim tradition of depicting Mohammed, which can be downloaded here in pdf format. In that essay, Ali demonstrates that the prohibition against depicting Mohammed did not arise until as late as the 16th or 17th century, despite the media's recent false claims that it has always been forbidden for Muslims to draw Mohammed. Until comparatively recently in Islamic history, it was perfectly common to show Mohammed, either in full (as revealed on this page), or with his face hidden (as shown on the next page). Even after the 17th century, up to modern times, Islamic depictions of Mohammed (especially in Shi'ite areas) continued to be produced.

On this page are many examples of full-faced Mohammed portraits produced by Muslim artists across the centuries. Attributions for each image are given where known.



Illustration showing Mohammed (on the right) preaching his final sermon to his earliest converts, on Mount Arafat near Mecca; taken from a medieval-era manuscript of the astronomical treatise The Remaining Signs of Past Centuries by the Persian scholar al-Biruni; currently housed in the collection of the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris (Manuscrits Arabe 1489 fol. 5v). This scene was popular among medieval Islamic artists, and several nearly identical versions of this drawing (such as this one [shown in detail below] and this one) were made in the Middle Ages.


Another version of the previous drawing (almost exactly the same, but with minor differences) , this one taken from a 13th-century Persian manuscript (most likely a different edition of al-Biruni's The Remaining Signs of Past Centuries) housed at the Edinburgh University Library, Scotland.


Detail of Mohammed from the picture above.

The image shown above was censored by the French textbook company Belin Editions in 2005. As explained and illustrated on this French-language Web site (an English translation of which you can find here), the April 2005 edition of their history and geography textbook had this original picture of Mohammed with his face visible; but the subsequent edition, from August 2005, had his face blotted out by the editors, in a misguided attempt to be politically sensitive.
(Hat tip: Gilles C.)


This classic image of Mohammed riding Buraq on his "Night Voyage" to Paradise has been reproduced frequently in the West over the years; this version was taken from the cover of the book The Miraculous Journey of Mahomet, by Marie-Rose Seguy. This illustration is one of several similar Islamic illustrations from the Medieval period showing the same scene; the exact provenance of this one is (as of this writing) unknown.


Mohammed's Flight from Mecca in 622 AD; Algerian color postcard from the 1920s or '30s. Mohammed is the figure dressed in red entering the cave. The original postcard is in a private collection. (To see a high-resolution version of the postcard which has a watermark visible, click here.)
(Hat tip: Martin H.)



The Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide has on display this vivid portrait of Mohammed, which was donated to the museum in 2009. The catalog listing says "Portrait of the Prophet Muhammad riding the Buraq. 1820-30, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, or Dehli [India]. Gouache, gold leaf on paper." The top image is the full painting; the second image is a close-up of just Mohammed from the center of the scene. Mohammed, the angels and Buraq are all wearing anachronistic clothing and accoutrements typical of the Mughal period in India, from when the painting was made, rather than historically accurate 7th-century Arabian garb. The city where the painting is from, Lucknow, is the center of Shi'ite Islam in India, and was part of a Muslim empire within the borders of what is now called India prior to it becoming unified as a single nation-state in the 20th century.


A cropped version of the full painting, seen here, circulates online without attribution and is sometimes used to illustrate articles about Islam or the Middle East, such as this one.
(Thanks to: Mark.)


Mohammed receiving his first revelation from the angel Gabriel. Miniature illustration on vellum from the book Jami' al-Tawarikh (literally "Compendium of Chronicles" but often referred to as The Universal History or History of the World), by Rashid al-Din, published in Tabriz, Persia, 1307 A.D. Now in the collection of the Edinburgh University Library, Scotland.


Detail of Mohammed from the picture above.


A young Mohammed being recognized by the monk Bahira. Miniature illustration on vellum from the book Jami' al-Tawarikh (literally "Compendium of Chronicles" but often referred to as The Universal History or History of the World), by Rashid al-Din, published in Tabriz, Persia, 1307 A.D. Now in the collection of the Edinburgh University Library, Scotland.


Detail of the young Mohammed from the image above.


Mohammed solves a dispute over lifting the black stone into position at the Kaaba. The legends tell how, when Mohammed was still a young man, the Kaaba was being rebuilt and a dispute arose between the various clans in Mecca over who had the right rededicate the black stone. (The Kaaba was at that time still a polytheistic shrine, this being many years before Islam was founded.) Mohammed resolved the argument by placing the stone on a cloth and having members of each clan lift the cloth together, raising the black stone into place cooperatively. Miniature illustration on vellum from the book Jami' al-Tawarikh (literally "Compendium of Chronicles" but often referred to as The Universal History or History of the World), by Rashid al-Din, published in Tabriz, Persia, 1307 A.D. Now in the collection of the Edinburgh University Library, Scotland.
(Hat tip: Brett K. and Martin H.)


Detail of Mohammed from the picture above.


Mohammed's birth. Miniature illustration on vellum from the book Jami' al-Tawarikh (literally "Compendium of Chronicles" but often referred to as The Universal History or History of the World), by Rashid al-Din, published in Tabriz, Persia, 1307 A.D. Now in the collection of the Edinburgh University Library, Scotland. (This image can be found online here.)
(Hat tip: Jos.)


Detail of the baby Mohammed from the painting above.
(Hat tip: Nils.)


The Mi'raj (also called the "Night Ride") of Mohammed on Buraq. Miniature illustration on vellum from the book Jami' al-Tawarikh (literally "Compendium of Chronicles" but often referred to as The Universal History or History of the World), by Rashid al-Din, published in Tabriz, Persia, 1307 A.D. Now in the collection of the Edinburgh University Library, Scotland.


Detail of Mohammed from the picture above.


Mohammed (on the far right) and Abu Bakr on their way to Medina while a woman milks a herd of goats. Miniature illustration on vellum from the book Jami' al-Tawarikh (literally "Compendium of Chronicles" but often referred to as The Universal History or History of the World), by Rashid al-Din, published in Tabriz, Persia, 1307 A.D. Now in the collection of the Edinburgh University Library, Scotland.


Mohammed on his deathbed. Miniature illustration on vellum from the book Jami' al-Tawarikh (literally "Compendium of Chronicles" but often referred to as The Universal History or History of the World), by Rashid al-Din, published in Tabriz, Persia, 1307 A.D. Now in the collection of the Edinburgh University Library, Scotland.


This Iranian site contains a photograph of a mural which appears to depict Mohammed (sixth picture down) on a contemporary building in Iran. The mural shows Buraq (the animal that carried Mohammed on his Night Voyage, described as being white and having the face of a woman and the tail of a peacock, which this creature is and does) carrying a figure who could therefore only be Mohammed. A word-for-word transliteration of the Farsi caption to that picture is (according to this automated translation site), "The Messenger mounted mainland shiny door village (yzdlaan) (kvyry) village blinds to ascension wine river," which obviously doesn't translate well but which does make mention of "The Messenger," a traditional epithet for Mohammed (as the messenger of Allah). Note: this image is hosted on the Web site of the Iranian newspaper Hamshahri, which is sponsoring a contest of cartoons about the Holocaust as an outraged reponse to the publication of the Mohammed cartoons in the West. Yet the newspaper itself is currently displaying this depiction of Mohammed. (This image also on the newspaper's site appears to be a different modern image of Mohammed as well.) [UPDATE: All the images linked to in this caption have now been taken offline by the Hamshahri newspaper, apparently after having been exposed here; the search-engine caches for the pages have also now expired, meaning that the small photo shown above is the only known surviving image of this unusual contemporary Mohammed depiction.]
(Hat tip: Kilgore Trout.)



In 1980, the Islamic Republic of Iran issued a stamp commemorating "The 15th Century of Islamic Prophet's Hejira" -- that is to say, the 1,400th anniversary of Mohammed's flight to Yathrib, a pivotal event known as the "Hejira" or "Hegira" (among other romanizations), which occured exactly 1,400 years (that is, years according to the Islamic calendar) before 1980 (which was the year 1400 in the Muslim world). On the stamp is depicted a man in ancient garb taking a journey, whom one can only assume is therefore Mohammed, since the stamp specifally commemorates a journey that Mohammed took. The stamp is a collector's item and is catalogued on various philatelic sites, such as Delcampe (where the third image above was found) and StampWorld (which depicts the only known uncancelled example of the stamp -- the fourth image above). However, various online stock photo services such as this one feature an image of the stamp along with a caption that claims the stamp "shows Salman Farsi (follower of Mohammad)." Salman the Persian (a.k.a "Salman Farsi") was the first Persian convert to Islam, but his name does not seem to appear anywhere on the stamp, and furthermore he met Mohammed and converted to Islam years after the Hejira, and hence did not take the journey himself -- thus, it makes little sense that he would be the one depicted on the stamp. More likely, this intentional misidentification was retroactively claimed for the figure on the stamp to cover up for the embarrassing fact that even a strictly Islamic regime had no problem with publishing an image of Mohammed, fatally undermining the recent claim that depicting Mohammed is and always has been "forbidden" in Islam. The second image is a high-resolution close-up of Mohammed on the stamp, taken from the first image above it.
(Thanks to: Dan from Canada.)


The Krapo Arboricole blog featured these two pages from Supplément turc 190 in the the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, depicting scenes from the Mi'raj Nameh -- Mohammed flying to heaven and hell on Buraq and being shown around by the Angel Gabriel. Depicted on the left is Mohammed visiting the "Thoubaa tree," and on the right he observes the "infernal tree." Made in Herat, Afghanistan, 1436.


Mohammed (upper right) visiting Paradise while riding Buraq, accompanied by the Angel Gabriel (upper left). Below them, riding camels, are some of the fabled houris of Paradise -- the "virgins" promised to heroes and martyrs. This image and the following five images are Persian, 15th century, from a manuscipt entitled Miraj Nama, which is in the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris. Taken from The Miraculous Journey of Mahomet, by Marie-Rose Seguy.


Mohammed, flying over Paradise, looks at the houris harvesting flowers and enjoying themselves. Persian, 15th century.


Mohammed, along with Buraq and Gabriel, visit Hell, and see a demon punishing "shameless women" who had exposed their hair to strangers. For this crime of inciting lust in men, the women are strung up by their hair and burned for eternity. Persian, 15th century.


Next, Mohammed sees women strung up by hooks thrust through their tongues by a green demon. Their crimes were to "mock" their husbands and to leave their homes without permission. Persian, 15th century.


Further on, Mohammed sees a red demon that is torturing women by hanging them up by hooks through their breasts, as they are engulfed in flames. The women are being punished for giving birth to illegitimate children whom they falsely claimed were fathered by their husbands. Persian, 15th century.


Mohammed (on the right, astride Buraq) and the Angel Gabriel (center) talk with Abraham (left) in Paradise. Persian, 15th century.

Another illustration apparently from the same series in this manuscript can be seen here.


Mohammed is apparently depicted twice in this painting, which is called "The Day of the Last Judgment." According to tradition, on Judgment Day Mohammed will offer drinks from a fountain in paradise to any Muslims who follow him there. At the upper left corner of the painting there is an unidentified prophet (with glowing halo, as Mohammed is usually shown) doing just that: sitting at a fountain in paradise offering someone a drink. A figure with the exact same outfit and face is also seen along with other holy men on the staircase in the center of the image, and is also likely Mohammed. The painting is unsigned but is attributed to the artist Mohammad Modabber. Undated, but likely from the late 19th century. In the Reza Abbasi Museum Collection (Iran). Published in the book Coffee-House Painting, by Hadi Seyf (published by the Reza Abbasi Museum).


Detail of the painting above, showing Mohammed seated at a fountain in paradise offering a drink to another Muslim entering the afterlife.


Another detail of the painting above, this time showing Mohammed holding a banner on the left side of the image, in the center of a staircase reserved for prophets. The person riding the camel on the right edge is likely his daughter Fatima.


According to the "Taboo Numismatics" site, this early Islamic coin -- a gold dinar issued during the reign of the caliph Abd al-Malik in 693 A.D. -- most likely depicts Mohammed himself. The author of the site makes a strong case that the central figure is Mohammed and that the figures on either side of him are Abu-Bakr (Mohammed's companion) on his left and Aisha (his young wife) on his right. Also suggesting that these now-extremely-rare coins (all now housed in the British Museum) depict Mohammed is the fact that they were all ordered to be destroyed shortly after being minted, which may have been the first instance of an image of Mohammed being seen as inappropriate. The coin was made only 67 years after Mohammed's death (the year 77 of the Islamic era, which dates to his arrival in Medina from Mecca), which would make it far and away the earliest depiction of Mohammed ever made, and possibly even modeled after memories of people who knew him during his lifetime.
(Hat tip: Ted K.)


The large head and wide mustache of Mohammed in this portait may have been modelled after this coin of Byzantine Emperor Constans II (seen on the right) which was struck decades earlier. The Islamic coin also seems to be emulating Byzantine coin designs of the same era which show Jesus on the obverse, in the place where the male figure is on the Islamic coin.

To follow the full argument, start at the first image in the series and click through to read the full captions for each coin.


The Night Journey of Muhammad on His Steed, Buraq; leaf from a copy of the Bustan of Sacdi, dated 1514. From Bukhara, Uzbekistan. In The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
(Hat tip: Jos.)



Muhammad's Call to Prophecy and the First Revelation; leaf from a copy of the Majmac al-tawarikh ("Compendium of Histories"), ca. 1425; Timurid. From Herat, Afghanistan. In The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
(Hat tip: Jos.)



Journey of the Prophet Muhammad; leaf from a copy of the Majmac al-tawarikh ("Compendium of Histories"), ca. 1425; Timurid. Herat, Afghanistan. In The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
(Hat tip: Jos.)



Mohammed presented to the monk Abd al Muttalib and the inhabitants of Mecca. 18th century Ottoman copy of a supposedly 8th century original. Now located in the Topkapi Palace Museum, Istanbul.


Detail of Mohammed from the picture above, in Paradise with beautiful females.


Mohammed in a cavern, in a painting entitled "The Charge of the Lion." The painting possibly depicts Mohammed (along with Abu Bakr, not depicted) hiding from pursuers in the Cave of the Bull during the Hijra in 622. Unknown provenance, now in the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris.


Detail of Mohammed from the picture above. He seems to have two left arms.


Another miniature showing Mohammed astride Buraq. Provenance unknown.
(Hat tip: Martin.)


Mohammed, Buraq and Gabriel encountering a multi-headed figure in heaven. From the same unknown manuscript as the image above.
(Hat tip: Martin.)


Mohammed on his prayer rug; Persia, late medieval (date unknown).


Mohammed meets the prophets Ismail, Is-hak and Lot in paradise. From the Apocalypse of Muhammad, written in 1436 in Herat, Afghanistan (now in the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris).
(Hat tip: A.L. and Buck.)


Detail of Mohammed from the picture above.


Detail of Mohammed from yet another picture in the Apocalypse of Muhammad, written in 1436 in Herat, Afghanistan (now in the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris).
(Hat tip: A.L.)


Mohammed arrives on the shores of the White Sea. Also from the Apocalypse of Muhammad, written in 1436 in Herat, Afghanistan (now in the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris).
(Hat tip: Buck.)


Mohammed greeting ambassadors from Medina. Likely of central Asian origin, though the site on which the image was found does not give an exact date or location.
(Hat tip: A.L.)


Detail of Mohammed from the same painting as above, which was also used as the cover of the book Mohammed und Seine Zeit (see the Archive's "Book Covers" page for the full version).
(Hat tip: A.L.)


Mohammed (far right) and the Archangel Gabriel standing in front of a giant angel. From the Miraj-name, Tabriz (c. 1360-70). In the Topkapi Palace Library, Istanbul.


Mohammed borne on Gabriel's shoulders, arriving at the gate of paradise guarded by the angel Ridwan. From the Miraj-name, Tabriz (c. 1360-70). In the Topkapi Palace Library, Istanbul.


An angel presenting Mohammed (upper left) and his companions with a miniature city. In the Topkapi Palace Library, Istanbul.


The Archangel Gabriel carries Mohammed on his shoulders over mountains where angels are shown among golden flames. In the Topkapi Palace Library, Istanbul.


Mohammed flying over Mecca, at the beginning of his "Night Journey." The square building in the center is the Ka'aba. From the manuscript entitled Khamseh, by Nezami, 1494-5. Currently in the British Museum. (A picture of the full manuscript page containing this painting can be seen here.)


Mohammed (right) and the Angel Gabriel (left) in a building with three domes. Provenance unknown.


Mohammed with (apparently) the Angel Gabriel. Origin unknown; image found on this Sufi site.
(Hat tip: Raafat.)


Mohammed at Medina, from an Arab or central Asian medieval-era manuscript.


The Ascension of the Prophet, also from Jami'al-Tawarikh ("The Universal History").


Mohammed Received by the Four Angels; Persia, 1436.


Mohammed (riding the horse) receiving the submission of the Banu Nadir, a Jewish tribe he defeated at Medina. From the Jami'al-Tawarikh, dated 1314-5. In the Nour Foundation's Nasser D. Khalili Collection of Islamic Art, London. This image was found here, and another version can be found here.
(Hat tip: Martin.)


Another version of the same image as above, also likely from Rashid al-Din's Jami'al-Tawarikh. This image is likely a redrawn lithograph of the original, and was printed in the book History of Egypt, by S. Rappoport, which contains the caption, "The original of the illustration is to be seen in a finely illuminated MS. of the ninth century, A. D., preserved in the India Office, London. The picture is of peculiar interest, being the only known portrait of Muhammed, who is evidently represented as receiving the divine command to propagate Muhammedanism." Obviously, the caption is in error; the style of drawing appears to come from later than the ninth century, and needless to say this is not "the only known portrait of Muhammed."
(Hat tip: Raafat.)


Mohammed exhorting his family before the battle of Badr. It is not immediately apparent which figure in this drawing is Mohammed. From the Jami'al-Tawarikh, dated 1314-5. In the Nour Foundation's Nasser D. Khalili Collection of Islamic Art, London.


Mohammed (on the left) leading Hamza and the Muslims against Banu Qaynuqa'. From the Jami'al-Tawarikh, dated 1314-5. In the Nour Foundation's Nasser D. Khalili Collection of Islamic Art, London.


This portrait of Mohammed is by 19th-century Iranian artist Sani ol molk and depicts him seated and with his face fully visible. It is currently in the collection of the National Museum in Tehran.


Portrait of Mohammed from a 19th century Iranian hilye (a single-page description of Mohammed and his attributes). In The Nasser D. Khalili Collection of Islamic Art). Taken from a reproduction published in the paper entitled "The Story of Portraits of the Prophet Muhammad," by Oleg Grabar, in Studia Islamica, No. 96.


Mohammed with head emanating flames (a sign of holiness). Source unknown.
(Hat tip: Steve N.)



Mohammed's death. Source unknown.

.
(Direct link to this section about modern Shi'ite icons)
In modern Iran it is not uncommon to encounter -- either on posters or as framed pictures -- Islamic religious icons depicting Mohammed as a comparatively young bearded man with a green turban, usually clutching a Qur'an. Some of these icons have found their way online; the source for most of them, including the one shown above, is this authoritative page posted at the University of Bergen site (original Norwegian-language version here) which displays and describes religious posters and images purchased by Norwegian scholar Ingvild Flaskerud in Qum, Iran in 1999. The caption for the image shown here at the University of Bergen site says:
Islam's prophet Muhammad ibn Abd Allah. ... While some Muslims hold beliefs that it is against Islam to make images of the Prophet, others have more relaxed attitudes, and among Shia Muslims, such pictures are common, and much liked. According to Iranian informants interviewed by Ingvild Flaskerud, such portraits should not be considered "real" portraits of the prophet Muhammad. The artists make these images on the basis of conventional ideas of the character of those personages depicted, in the same way it has been done with Biblical figures in European art. The text below the image is the shahada or Profession of faith: "There is no god but Allah, Muhammad is His messenger."
Needless to say, the excuse cited above (that these don't count as "real" Mohammed portraits because they are not photographically accurate but instead are stylized representations based on the popular notion of what he may have looked like) is absurd, and by that definition all portraits of everyone who lived prior to the invention of photography are spurious.


Here's another prototypical example from the University of Bergen page, which in this case shows Mohammed with a single finger pointing upwards, and accompanied not only by a calligraphic rendition of the shahada but also "medallions in the upper corners contain[ing] the words 'Allah' (to the right) and 'Muhammad' (to the left)," according to the picture's original caption.


The most famous of the Shi'ite iconic posters depicting Mohammed, seen here, has been circulating widely on the Internet since 2005 and is of unknown origin; although a copy of the image was uploaded here to the University of Bergen server, it apparently did not originate there because it is not discussed or displayed anywhere on the university's "Muslim devotional posters" site. Its definitive identification as Mohammed is instead confirmed by this video which shows a German reporter visiting a religious souvenir shop in Iran where he asks if they have any posters of Mohammed; he is eventually shown a poster with this same figure on it, which the shopkeeper confirms is indeed a picture of Mohammed:


These two screenshots from the video show that the poster in the shop features the exact same famous portrait (on a slightly different background); the reporter asks, "So this is the picture of [Prophet] Mohammed, right?", to which the shopkeeper replies, pointing at it, "Yes! This is Mohammed."

Further confirming the identification of this figure as Mohammed is that he shares many of the exact same characteristics as the Mohammed icons on the University of Bergen site -- right index finger pointing upward, holding a Koran in his left arm, green turban, brown robe, long hair, identical beard, etc. It's unquestionably the same person. For a while there had been some doubt as to whether these icons depicted Mohammed or instead his cousin Ali, but the discovery of this video and the University of Bergen page confirms that it is indeed Mohammed.

Several readers have also emailed the Archive to say that one simple way to distinguish a Mohammed icon from an Ali icon (which otherwise can seem to be nearly identical) is that Ali is usually depicted carrying his totemic double-tipped sword Zulfiqar, whereas Mohammed is usually depicted carrying a copy of the Koran (as he is in the portraits shown above). Examples of Shi'ite icons of Ali holding Zulfiqar can be viewed here, as a point of comparison to show how they contrast with the Mohammed/Koran portraits.



This third religious picture from the University of Bergen site perfectly illustrates the difference between Mohammed and Ali in Shi'ite icons, as explained in its caption:
Picture depicts Muhammad in the middle with his veiled daughter Fatima to his left, his cousin and son in law Ali on his right hand, and grandchildren, Ali and Fatima's two sons, Hasan (in green) and Husain (in red). "The holy family" has a high position among all Muslims, but especially among Shia Muslims. Their names are written in the rosette to the left, top says "Allah", then follow clockwise: Muhammad, Fatima Husain, Hasan and Ali. ... Behind Muhammad is the messenger Djibril (Gabriel) with Quran in his hands. ... On this as on other pictures of Ali, he keeps one of his characteristics in his hands, sword [Zulfiqar] with the characteristic double header.
These icons of Mohammed rocketed to momentary fame in early 2006 when at the height of the uproar over the "cartoon crisis" the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten linked to the previously obscure University of Bergen site to prove that Muslims themselves often depict Mohammed, debunking the trumped-up claim that there is a universal taboo against such representations. The article at Jyllands-Posten was, however, subsequently deleted, although the Bergen source page remains online to this day.


The seated portrait of Mohammed and his family, immediately above, is actually just one panel from a very large poster containing several iconic pictures; you can see the original small panel in the top row, second from the right. Norwegian scholar Ingvild Flaskerud purchased the large poster in Qum, Iran in 1999, and a scanned version of it was uploaded here to the University of Bergen server, but it does not seem to be discussed or displayed anywhere in their "Muslim devotional posters" site. Additionally, the second Mohammed icon in the poster series above -- the one with his finger pointing upward and two yellow medallions on either side of his head -- was also excerpted from this larger poster, and can be seen on the bottom row, third from the left.

This oversized poster was apparently intended to be cut up into smaller individual icons, which could be displayed or sold one by one. The vast majority of them depict Ali, Mohammed's cousin and the second-most revered figure in Shi'ite Islam.

Upon close inspection, however, there are two additional portraits of Mohammed also included in this large poster which were never scanned separately by Flaskerud, so the only available versions of them are the extremely small reproductions seen here. Each are presented below as separate individual jpegs, since they each count as their own unique images of Mohammed.


On the bottom row, second from the right, is this portrait of an Islamic figure clutching a Koran, which according to the iconography discussed above and its context in this larger poster of religious icons is almost certainly another portrait of Mohammed.


And lastly, at the bottom right corner of the larger poster (sideways in the original, but straightened out here) is this detailed iconic scene which includes (in the right-hand oval) an extremely tiny copy of the "finger pointing upward" Mohammed portrait (third from the left, bottom row of the large poster). This tiny oval portrait, excerpted and presented separately above as its own jpeg, is, at only 18 x 22 pixels, the smallest depiction of Mohammed in the entire Mohammed Image Archive.


An interesting contemporary icon of Mohammed produced by the Alevi sect in Turkey is discussed on a hard-to-find page at the University of Bergen site (direct link to the image here) and seems to have entirely escaped the notice of the general public, unlike the other icons on the site which were widely shared. The original caption for the page where the image appears (alongside the first Iranian poster above) says:
In certain reference works and books about Islam, we may come across the claim that even if the Prophet Muhammad was represented in pictorial form in earlier times, no pictorial representation of Him is permitted in our times. This reflects the state in Sunni areas, where images of the Prophet are rare. In Shia Islam, however, the situation is different, and pictures of the Prophet are quite common. These two pictures come from [Shia Muslims in Iran and] Alevis in Turkey. (Although Alevis emphatically state that they are not Shia Muslims, there are historical and other connections between the two forms of Islam.) In both pictures, the Prophet is holding the Koran in his hand. ... His raised index finger in the lower picture underlines the unity of God. (Purchased in [Iran and] Turkey.)
Lastly, there are two depictions of Mohammed which were uploaded to the University of Bergen server but which are not discussed or displayed anyhwere on their "Muslim devotional posters" site and for which there is absolutely no attribution or information:


This medallion was apparently once for sale on eBay (the image has an eBay watermark at the lower right) and depicts Mohammed in the same pose as in several of the posters above, with his finger pointing upwards and holding a Koran. The original image was found here. Based on the design, it almost certainly was also recently purchased in Iran and is of Shi'ite origin.


The final image of Mohammed hidden on the University of Bergen site shows some kind of weaving or tapestry and is a variant of the "Mohammed seated with his family" icon shown above; the figures in the scene are therefore Mohammed (in the center), Fatima (on the left) Ali (on the right), Hasan and Husain (the two children), and the Angel Gabriel (behind). Original image found here.



Links to additional full-face Mohammed images:

This Los Angeles Times article from February 17 points out that several leading museums in the United States possess Islamic portraits of Mohammed in their permanent collections, though they are rarely displayed. (Hat tip: Killgore Trout.)
This February 14 article in the Washington Post also lists several museums and galleries in the U.S. which own paintings of Mohammed.
Several small reproductions of Mohammed can be found on this site by clicking on the small icons in the center of the page.
Two small images of Mohammed leading his army can be found on this Spanish educational site.
The Miraculous Journey of Mahomet, a book by Marie-Rose Seguy, contains many images of Mohammed.
Selection of images from the 15th century manuscript Miraj Nameh.
This Spanish site features a Persian miniature that supposedly depicts Jesus and Mohammed riding together, though there is no attribution for the image. (Hat tip: Raafat.)



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European Medieval and Renaissance Images
Dante's Inferno
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