Are you ready for the most ridiculous and pointless Occupation ever?

Last week, on Earth Day, the Occupy movement illegally took over an entire farm and transformed it into…a farm!

So proud are they of this revolutionary act that they showed off the farm to the media yesterday, so naturally I had to check it out.

The farm they seized was not a working farm per se, but rather a “research farm” for the University of California, near its Berkeley campus. The only difference between the way the farm used to be (prior to a week ago) and the way it is now is that the Occupiers have transformed what was essentially a well-maintained and important open-air laboratory into a disheveled and ultimately purposeless pretend-farm for trustafarian dropouts.

The struggle over the farm is not just a struggle over land; it is a Battle of Narratives. The “Occupy the Farm” group (loosely affiliated with Occupy Cal and Occupy Oakland, but a new separate group) has already put up a slick web site called “Take Back the Tract” which explains the “philosophy” justifying their behavior:

We are reclaiming this land to grow healthy food to meet the needs of local communities. We envision a future of food sovereignty, in which our East Bay communities make use of available land – occupying it where necessary – for sustainable agriculture to meet local needs.

…followed by a raft of conspiracy theories involving Whole Foods and senior centers and baseball fields.

The university, on the other hand, has fired back with a devastating press release of its own, dismantling Occupy’s ludicrous theories and moral gymnastics:

• The agricultural fields on the Gill Tract that are now being occupied are not the site of a proposed assisted living center for senior citizens and a grocery store. The proposed development parcel is to the south, straddling the intersection of Monroe Street and San Pablo Avenue, and has not been farmed since WWII.

• The existing agricultural fields on the Gill Tract are currently, and for the foreseeable future, being used as an open-air laboratory by the students and faculty of our College of Natural Resources for agricultural research. Their work encompasses basic plant biology, alternative cropping systems, plant-insect interactions and tree pests and pathogens. These endeavors are part of the larger quest to provide a hungry planet with more abundant food, and will be impeded if the protest continues. And, they are categorically not growing genetically modified crops. We have an obligation to support their education and research, and an obligation to the American taxpayers who are funding these federally funded projects.

• The university has been actively participating in a collaborative, five-year long community engagement process about our proposed development project with hundreds of hours of meetings, hearings and dialogue. We have a great deal of respect for all those who have been involved and regret that “Occupy the Farm” appears to have little regard for the process or the people who have participated in it.

We take issue with the protesters’ approach to property rights. By their logic they should be able to seize what they want if, in their minds, they have a better idea of how to use it.

To clarify matters for those not familiar with the area:

The University of California has its main campus in the center of Berkeley, but that’s not the only property it owns. Scattered around the East Bay, the university also owns several other large tracts of land, used for housing, office buildings, research facilities, storage, and so forth. One of these properties, known colloquially as “Albany Village” because it’s in the adjacent small town of Albany, is home to a housing complex for students who are married (and/or who have children) which is called “University Village”; and nearby on the same property is an experimental farm technically known as the “Agricultural Research Fields” but more commonly referred to simply as “the Gill Tract,” named after the Gill family which farmed the land originally.

The Gill Tract, about the size of a city block, is used by researchers and graduate students in UC’s College of Natural Resources to study biology, crop yields, plant diseases and genetics — often with an eye toward ecologically friendly, sustainable and organic practices.

Here’s one of the few articles in the mainstream media about Occupy the Farm, giving the basic facts and also pointing out that the biological researchers need access to the land immediately for their experiments because of the spring planting season.

The scientists themselves are for the most part royally pissed off at the Occupiers and some may have years of work ruined by the Occupiers’ juvenile prank.

Now that you know the whole story, let’s look around the Gill Tract today, shall we?


COMPOST CAPITALISM! In this context, is “Compost” a verb, or an adjectival noun? Are we supposed to compost capitalism, i.e. throw it on the compost heap; or is Occupy engaging in the practice of compost capitalism, a form of free trade based on the compost standard? Only your Marxist knows for sure.


Working in the hot sun. The thrill of breaking into gated property and “liberating” land is exciting; the tedium of then spending endless hours over the next year in the blistering heat, in order to legitimize your actions and prove you’re not just jacking everyone around — not so fun.

Prediction: Very few, if any, of these “crops” will ever be harvested, or even grow to maturity.


Before the Occupation, the Gill Tract was an agricultural research farm where twenty-somethings getting their PhDs would work the fields to grow crops, as they researched biology or how to raise better, healthier plants. But now, after this incredible revolution by Occupy, the Gill Tract has been utterly transformed into a farm where twenty-somethings work the fields to grow crops. The only difference is that before, the farm served a scientific function to improve society, and was managed by experts and hard-working students doing meaningful research; but now, it’s run by a bunch of smug amateurs and dropouts who plant store-bought seedlings in the middle of what once was a controlled research environment. Meet the new farm — same as the old farm, except worse.


Just as in collective farms in Russia and China, the first order of business at the occupied farm was to set up an open-air lecture space so the “workers” (necessarily with sarcastic quote marks in this case) can receive their daily political instruction.


Only a handful of rows, right near the entrance, were planted all along their length, from end to end. Soon enough, those rows gave way to other rows with just a few plants near the walkway, seemingly just for show, while the rest of the row went unused.


Many rows’ plantings were pretty pitiful, or perhaps just symbolic; in this case, for instance, a single full-grown leek was stuck in the ground at the start of one row, to simulate the concept of “farming leeks.”


The vast majority of the tract had been Roto-tilled but still remained unplanted as of yesterday.


Elsewhere around the acreage here and there were various ill-considered haphazard zones of a few transplanted seedlings. The plant with the label near the center is a young citrus tree, bought at a nursery, and stuck in the soil at this essentially random spot. Since it takes citrus trees several years to mature enough to bear fruit, this sapling will be growing here for quite a long time before it becomes a producing tree. Had Occupy really thought out the location of this tree, for the long-term — or was it (as I suspect) just some dude who stuck it there without much (or any) foresight; and since he won’t be around three years from now to tend it, why should he care that it will likely interfere with other uses for that part of the tract?


Wait, what — “our” lot? Suddenly you’re in favor of private property and ownership, now that you’ve stolen it? How is that lot yours any more than it was the university’s before you took it?


Hypocrisy, thy name is Occupy. When society draws boundaries, builds fences, and makes rules, Occupy gets to violate them at will. But once they’ve seized control, Occupy immediately starts making new rules and new boundaries that everyone else is supposed to honor. Perhaps that’s the new Occupy motto: “Rules for thee, but not for me.”


Despite several signs in the area declaring that the Gill Tract Occupation was not a “tent city,” as detractors had worried, but was instead devoted entirely to farming, in reality a tent…well, let’s just call it a “tent eco-village” has sprung up in the fields. This is not a tent city! Who do you trust — me, or your lying eyes?


Some leftist U.C. professors are lecturing today at the farm to show their solidarity with the Occupiers (and to thoughtlessly reveal their antagonism against fellow faculty members whose research at the farm was interrupted/spoiled by the Occupation), including Laura Nader (Ralph Nader’s older sister, famous for helping to lead the field of anthropology toward self-critical Political Correctness); Gill Hart, a Gramscian anti-capitalist; and Paul Rabinow, a deconstructionist anthropologist. What do any of these professors know about farming, or plant biology? Nothing. But hey, they know about the significance of what it means to spout off a bunch of revolutionary socialist verbiage while absconding with stuff that isn’t yours. And that will make the Occupiers feel ever so snug in their smugness. Group hug!


Because the Gill Tract occupation only began a week or so ago, there was no time to grow plants from seed — not that the Occupiers would have the patience for that anyway — so their version of “farming” means buying* (with daddy’s credit card) flats and six-packs of sprouts from local nurseries, and then transplanting them into the ground. Wow! That is some major farming.
( • Or “liberating” or getting donations of pre-grown six-packs. )


In response to the “occupation,” the university turned off the water at the Gill Tract. As a result, the “Occupiers” have to truck in giant tanks of water, which they sprinkle from bottles onto the seedlings. Sustainable! Eco!


Out in the field, the Occupiers had placed two scarecrows; this one in particular really emulated the Occupy “style,” as it were. Or maybe that was one of the Occupiers, after a really rough night?


Whether made of straw or flesh-and-blood, the scarecrow wore Occupy and Anonymous buttons.


The other wore a hat made of a big funnel. Unfortunately, it resembled a coolie hat, costing the Occupiers -15 points on their colonialist sensitivity rating.


Occupy Law #1: Smiley-faces and peace signs make theft OK.


Amendment to Law #1: Framing your crime in a heart shape transforms it into a “cause.”


Occupy Law #2: Everyone — even the dorkiest dorks — instantly becomes cool with the addition of an Anarchy tattoo.


Visit Amy’s tent for an individual stress-relaxation “hypnosis” session which she guarantees will have a “happy” ending.


The Occupiers heavily advertised their “Children’s Village,” unveiled on Saturday so the media could film it. Some parents brought their kids to the festivities.


A man sat alone in the weeds, wearing a shirt that used the word “far” as a verb.


Most of the action was in the sanitary — really, it was very very hygienic, I swear — Occupy Kitchen area, where Occupiers clustered around and ate food produced by agribusiness and corporations.


To justify their theft of publicly owned land, the Occupiers produced this magnificent manifesto explaining the moral underpinnings of their action, and then posted it at the front gate of the farm. It might be a little hard to read at this size, so click on the image to see it in full-size high resolution. Here’s a transcription:

SEEDS
Local Ecology
ENERGY
Sovereignty
Alternatives
LAND
People-power
ORGANIZED
Ecstatic Wonder

This Poster Comes Out of the Gill Tract Occupation
On April 22, 2012, students, activists and neighbors came together to reclaim the last untouched tract of soil in the East Bay. This piece of public land has been (mis)managed by the University of California Regents for private interest for generations. On Earth Day, the land was liberated; transformed into a living, breathing space for the community to know food and stories.

This farm embodies what we envision as an alternative to the profit-drivern educational system. With bolt-cutters, shovels, Roto-tillers and thousands of plants: we reclaim our right to shape our communities, our universities + our minds + bodies.

Love the Land!
50
x100 feet
OR
15,000
TOOLS

This is what the ecstatic wonder of a truly public education looks + feels like.

Isn’t that precious? Pin it on the bulletin board next to the turkey-hand tracings and the construction-paper collages.


As always happens with Occupations, the Occupiers spend almost all of their energy on the day-to-day business of occupying, and rarely have much time to actually do whatever it is they claim they’re doing at that particular Occupation. Thus, in this case, as I witnessed out in the fields, not much in the way of actual farming has happened yet; as the camp’s official volunteer sign-up sheet reveals, nearly 80% of the activities at the “farm” have nothing whatsoever to do with farming, but instead are political and/or household chores. Of the 51 volunteer man-hour time-slots listed, 40 (79%) are non-farm activities (“parking/trash transport,” “table crew for workshops,” “kitchen,” “Porta Pottie cleaning,” “trash can monitor,” “security (creepwatch),” “MCs,” “movie set-up,” “childcare/art,” “media tent,” and “info desk,” while only 11 (21%) are farm-related (planting, watering, permaculture, and to be generous “clucking,” which may have something to do with chickens).

Because, prior to the Occupation, this tract of land was used exclusively for agricultural research (and not establishing a grunge encampment), there’s actually less farming going on now than there was before.

But that fact gets in the way of The Narrative, so it must be vigorously discarded and ignored.


Cross-posted at PJMedia.

49 Responses to “Meet the New Farm, Same as the Old Farm? Occupy Seizes Berkeley’s “Gill Tract””

  1. 1Kevin on Apr 29, 2012 at 11:28 pm:

    Where I live, if you trespass on someone else’s property, you get to spend the night in jail. Doesn’t California have a law like that?

      

  2. 2Irving Feldspar on Apr 30, 2012 at 12:22 pm:

    Three people to watch a trash can and one person to water?

    Wildabeast and Dante seem to do most of the work, heck Wildabeast with help from Marissa is doing all the clucking.

    Why are they clucking?

      

  3. 3Gork on Apr 30, 2012 at 5:05 pm:

    Bizarre. Notice how pale and flaccid most of these people are. They’ve probably never planted or harvested a crop in their lives. Notice how few people they actually have to do this work. That’s communism for you: everyone’s a boss, and nobody wants to be a worker. They don’t get paid nearly as well as the bosses, so why would they bother working?

    I will be sincerely impressed if any of these idiots are still there to harvest anything in three months.

      

  4. 4Hurricane on Apr 30, 2012 at 6:18 pm:

    If you have a festival ever day won’t it lose its thrill after a while?

      

  5. 5Jeffer's son ian on Apr 30, 2012 at 7:03 pm:

    Used “far” as a verb. Now that’s funny.

      

  6. 6Too Soon? on Apr 30, 2012 at 7:16 pm:

    Where’s the Ohio National Guard when you really need them…?

      

  7. 7Kyle Kiernan on Apr 30, 2012 at 7:35 pm:

    For maximum irony fun, make sure the chain link fence completely encloses the site, no gates thank you very much, and let them farm this tract with survival as the prize. Get some cameras on booms overlooking the site and some shotgun mikes and we’ve got a hit reality show.

      

  8. 8Randy on Apr 30, 2012 at 7:41 pm:

    I guess it’s not particularly ironic that the people that advocate “From each according to their ability, to each according to the need” have so manifestly little actual ability at producing things anyone needs.

      

  9. 9Jennifer on Apr 30, 2012 at 7:47 pm:

    These people are idiots.
    If they tried to occupy my farm~things would play out far differently. Of course on my farm, in a natural, organic, conservative setting where things are done to preserve finances, limit extra work, and maximize the highest yield~ reality would set in.
    I would love to watch the Occupy folks try and deal with rams, bucks, turkeys, geese, while trying to get the gardens in…

      

  10. 10scottst on Apr 30, 2012 at 9:38 pm:

    They give out all these jobs, and no one is in charge of cocktails?

    Amateurs.

      

  11. 11yat on May 1, 2012 at 6:24 am:

    Quick glance at the list and I am seeing a lot more female names than I am male -or would that be sexist to make that observation? You’ve got the guy shirtless guy and the woman (womyn) dressed in the scarf/vest/leggin’s and shrug (I just learned that word), I’ll bet she is a veeeeeeegan. As others have observed, none of this kids look like they EVER done real manual labor.

      

  12. 12Doctor Jeff on May 1, 2012 at 6:36 am:

    Another classic awesome Zombie post about the hypocracy of the “Occupy” movement. Like you said, its more about narrative than substance! Very much like a modern George Orwell Animal Farm!

      

  13. 13looking closely on May 1, 2012 at 7:26 am:

    If these “occupiers” are so willing to work on farms, why don’t they get ACTUAL farm jobs?

    They do still exist, even in CA.

    Hell, in CA, with the appropriate State licensure (naturally) they can even legally farm MARIJUANA, something that seems right in line with the occupty hippie ethos.

    Of course the question answers itself. If these criminal occupiers were ACTUALLY willing to work (ie “real” work, not pre-school play-farmer pretend “work”), they’d already have day jobs and not have the free time necessary to devote to “occupying” someone elses property.

      

  14. 14PCG on May 1, 2012 at 4:12 pm:

    These morons don’t seem to have any idea that growing all your own food using primitive methods means you have to spend all your time farming. Some dumb peasant during the Middle Ages had more brains than these cretins.

    No hippy drum circles, no meditation class, no consciousness-raising sessions, just work, work, and more back-breaking work. This will fail for the usual reason – hippies hate to work.

      

  15. 15KAW68 on May 1, 2012 at 6:05 pm:

    Are you trying to tell us that someone actually wrote this entry? Someone woke up, stretched, presumably took a shower, ate a hearty breakfast and thought to him/herself that “this is an article for the ages!”?

    Wow, just…wow.

      

  16. 16Jon on May 1, 2012 at 7:48 pm:

    He didn’t use “far” as a verb. He misspelled “too.” “…come too far”

      

  17. 17Socratease on May 2, 2012 at 6:37 am:

    Zimbabwe North.

      

  18. 18Dennis on May 2, 2012 at 10:07 pm:

    Jon: I see subtle humor escapes you.

      

  19. 19arhooley on May 5, 2012 at 7:09 pm:

    Update! The University orders the Occupiers off by Saturday night (May 5). They also offer to let the Occupiers use a portion of the tract if they play nice.

    http://www.dailycal.org/2012/05/05/administrators-ask-encampment-to-decide-its-fate-by-saturday-night/

      

  20. 20PlatosLeftBall on May 5, 2012 at 7:28 pm:

    What’s to keep me and a few of my burly friends from occupying the occupy?

    Seriously, the university is taking a hands-off approach here. If I stage a counter revolution, what could the uni say about it?

      

  21. 21richb on May 7, 2012 at 8:14 pm:

    So, basically from now on, the university is going to have to build a huge wall and hire more security to keep these dimwits off the “farm”? So the researchers can do their jobs, which by the way IS the kind of farming most left wingers wished all American farms were, “organic”.

      

  22. 22MP on May 10, 2012 at 2:57 pm:

    The “occupiers” would make sub-par fertilizer. So they aren’t worth s*it.

      

  23. 23Majorie Khanzada-Paar on May 18, 2012 at 3:17 am:

    …But did you even talk to any of them? How do you know that some, many or most of them aren’t already urban gardeners and farmers? How do you know that those professors who spoke don’t garden or farm? Are you implying that in order to know anything about farming, you need to be a full time farmer?

    On that note, are you implying that there is only one type of farming? Don’t you know that these people are trying to use organic, environmentally-friendly methods rather than the chemical and pesticide heavy methods that were being used by the university?

    It might have behooved you to talk to some of the occupiers and find out what they’re doing rather than make assumptions simply based on what you see.

      

  24. 24Majorie Khanzada-Paar on May 18, 2012 at 3:58 am:

    Also, these are the reasons for the occupation from their website. I know you addressed the 3rd one, but you still didn’t address the others. The fourth one is particular important.

    1. These are the last acres of Class One soil left in the urbanized East Bay. Ninety percent of the original land has been paved over and developed, irreverisibly contaminating the land.
    2. Students, professors, and local residents have fought for decades to save this amazing land from development and use it for sustainable agriculture.
    3. UCB capital projects currently administors this land and has slated it for rezoning and redevelopment in 2013 (i.e. supermarkets, parking lots, and apartments).
    4. The University uses the land to research corn genetics. This research can be conducted anywhere as opposed to this unique site.

      

  25. 25JustVic on May 20, 2012 at 4:50 am:

    Which row has the cannibis plants? Is that row fully planted? Is it the best tended row in the field? Enquiring minds want to know!!
    As someone who grew up on a real working farm, and knows the labor involved in row crops and large gardens first hand, it would be interesting to see this “experiment” play out IF the Occupiers had to actually sustain themselves on their own.

      

  26. 26Carvo on May 25, 2012 at 6:03 pm:

    Show made from this material:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/designsbydianne
    “Occupy Animal Farm”

      

  27. 27outbreakzone on May 27, 2012 at 2:36 am:

      

  28. 28plusafdotcom on May 29, 2012 at 10:45 pm:

    Majorie Khanzada-Paar: Also, these are the reasons for the occupation from their website. I know you addressed the 3rd one, but you still didn’t address the others. The fourth one is particular important.1. These are the last acres of Class One soil left in the urbanized East Bay. Ninety percent of the original land has been paved over and developed, irreverisibly contaminating the land.2. Students, professors, and local residents have fought for decades to save this amazing land from development and use it for sustainable agriculture.3. UCB capital projects currently administors this land and has slated it for rezoning and redevelopment in 2013 (i.e. supermarkets, parking lots, and apartments).4. The University uses the land to research corn genetics. This research can be conducted anywhere as opposed to this unique site.

    M K-P… that “last vestige of prime farmland” would feed how many people for how long, sustainably or not..?
    If those folks are already urban farmers, why aren’t they home farming their own urbans and supplying food for their own families and/or community rather than invading and occupying property they don’t own?

    oh, but wait… that’s the whole IDEA of the “Occupy Movement…” occupy someone else’s property, make your points by ruining their property and then leaving with media in tow. Sorry… I forgot.

    Welcome back to the lunacy of the ’60s and ’70s. I was there. I watched it. I didn’t participate, and it, too, passed. But this stuff happens in cycles… whether they’re five, 10, 20 or 50 years from peak to peak. This one apparently has a periodicity of 50 years. Enjoy!

      

  29. 29JustVic on Jun 10, 2012 at 11:36 am:

    It’s now the second week of June. Are the ‘Occupiers’ still there?
    Most of what the Zombie posts concerns one day, short term events. This episode could last much longer. Are there going to be follow up reports? Be interesting to see what this ‘farm’ looks like in Mid-August if these people are still on site. Do any of them have a clue what it’s like to weed a garden this size by hand an a continuing basis in summer weather? I doubt it.

      

  30. 30BallisticBob on Jun 10, 2012 at 4:49 pm:

    I saw this and immediately thought of Zombietime:

      

  31. 31BallisticBob on Jun 10, 2012 at 4:49 pm:

      

  32. 32BallisticBob on Jun 10, 2012 at 4:50 pm:

  33. 33Majorie K-P on Jun 17, 2012 at 3:29 am:

    plusafdotcom:
    M K-P…that “last vestige of prime farmland” would feed how many people for how long, sustainably or not..?
    If those folks are already urban farmers, why aren’t they home farming their own urbans and supplying food for their own families and/or community rather than invading and occupying property they don’t own?oh, but wait… that’s the whole IDEA of the “Occupy Movement…”occupy someone else’s property, make your points by ruining their property and then leaving with media in tow. Sorry… I forgot.Welcome back to the lunacy of the ’60s and ’70s.I was there.I watched it.I didn’t participate, and it, too, passed.But this stuff happens in cycles… whether they’re five, 10, 20 or 50 years from peak to peak.This one apparently has a periodicity of 50 years.Enjoy!

    Hey Plusafdotcom. I see your point – especially with the whole ‘can organic really feed people’ argument. It’s a common misconception that organic can’t feed the world. Definitely some seed varieties produced organically don’t yield as much as GM crops, but then others, properly farmed do (see Shiva 1993, Pimentel et al 2005, Azadi et al 2011). It’s all about where you get your information from, which studies you read, etc.

    As you may or may not know, land is hard to come by in urban areas. Not because it’s not there – indeed almost all the vacant lots in Brooklyn, NY add up to 596 acres or more – but because access is difficult. Oftentimes, with private property, you obviously can’t access them. But even trying to access government property through legal means is difficult and bureaucratic (talk to any urban gardener/farmer). Technically, the Gill Tract is gov’t land and the occupiers feel that the government isn’t properly utilizing that land. So they decided to protest that through occupation. Because chances are, if they didn’t and tried to make chance through the current legal provisions, by the time they actually get to use the land, the soil will be eroded because of various GM farming practices (again, I’ll cite studies if you want).

    You know, you make an interesting point about cycles and peaks. But I would argue that it’s been around even since the 1910s-20s (think formation of labor unions, Amalgamated, etc.), communism (in Europe but the ideas also spread to America), etc. I think more often than not, we’re seeing a shift in efforts to minimize and squash out this ‘lunacy’ rather than real ways of addressing it and grappling with the issues they’re talking about.

    Also, JustVic, don’t stereotype. Do you like it when people stereotype conservatives as dumb hicks or heartless bigots?

      

  34. 34Xanne on Jun 21, 2012 at 7:00 am:

    For something REALLY revolutionary, visit a real urban farm, urban adamah, just a few miles up on San Pablo and Parker, in Berkeley. Working together, legally, a handful of dedicated community members took an empty lot and turned it into something really wonderful .

      

  35. 35JustVic on Jun 26, 2012 at 11:11 pm:

    So asking honest questions is now stereotyping?
    I’d really like to see what this occupation will look like in mid summer IF these people are still there.

      

  36. 36Majorie K-P on Jun 30, 2012 at 12:10 am:

    I think they were kicked out by the police and forbidden to return in mid-May (?). But they’re still putting out a newsletter and perhaps regrouping. Not sure.

      

  37. 37Think on Nov 5, 2012 at 9:02 am:

    The underlying problem here is the University’s failure to immediately have these people arrested, fined, sued for damages.
    I shall make an assumption: correct me if I am wrong. Federal tax dollars (my money, your money) support this University and/or its College of Natural Resources and/or any one or all of the students who were originally utilizing the Gill Tract for legitimate educational purposes.
    Thus, the Uni’s failure to prosecute immediately threw tax dollars down the drain, and failed to teach. Failed to teach their PhD students until damages could be repaired, and failed to teach either their PhD students or the young thugs that breaking laws results in consequences.
    All federal tax dollars supporting this University, its research, or any one of it’s many students should be cut off.
    No taxes should be given a University that fails in its mission to TEACH should be supported.

      

  38. 38James on Dec 11, 2012 at 4:10 am:

    Of course on my farm, in a natural, organic, conservative setting where things are done to preserve finances, limit extra work, and maximize the highest yield~ reality would set in. But even trying to access government property through legal means is difficult and bureaucratic (talk to any urban gardener/farmer).

      

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